This song is an antidote for:

  • Worry
  • Angst
  • Suffering
  • Irritation with God

Listen to the song (download mp3):

Bonus Track (download mp3): 

Watch the session with Satyaki:

From A Tale of Songs, by Swami Kriyananda:

I wrote this song first in Italian, while I lived in Italy. Therefore I place the Italian words first. I later translated the song into English.

Quando mi sveglio per salutar il sol,
Quando esco nella città:
Nel silenzio del mio cuor, Signor,
Penserò solo a Te.

Quando rido e quando piango,
Nei malintesi e nell’amor:
Nel silenzio del mio cuor, Signor,
Penserò solo a Te.

Coro:
Dio, Dio, sono Tuo per l’eternità.
Dio, Dio, Tuo per l’eternità.

Nella sconfitta, nella vittoria,
Nella vita intorno a me:
Nel silenzio del mio cuor, Signor,
Penserò solo a Te.

Nel lavoro e nel riposo,
Nella gioia e nel dolor:
Nel silenzio del mio cuor, Signor,
Penserò solo a Te.

Coro:
Dio, Dio, sono Tuo per l’eternità.
Dio, Dio, Tuo per l’eternità.

I Will Always Think of Thee (English Version)

1. Every morning when I greet the sun,
When I move forth through crowded ways,
In my heart, Lord, ever so silently,
I will always think of Thee!

2. When I laugh, oh, and when I cry with pain,
When my best friends misunderstand,
In my heart, Lord, ever so silently,
I will always think of Thee!

Chorus:
Dear God, my God, I am Thine for eternity!
Dear God, my God, I am Thine eternally!

3. Though my path lead me over desert sands,
Though it take me through bitter storms,
In my heart, Lord, ever so silently,
I will always think of Thee!

4. When I’m working and when in earned repose,
Let come vict’ry or low defeat,
In my heart, Lord, ever so silently,
I will always think of Thee!

Chorus:
Dear God, my God, I am Thine for eternity!
Dear God, my God, I am Thine eternally!

The song as an antidote (Satyaki’s comments):

In my heart, Lord, ever so silently,
I will always think of Thee
.

Yogananda repeatedly talked about keeping God in one’s heart and one’s mind throughout the day, and Quando Mi Sveglio truly reflects that sentiment. Indeed, the fact that this thinking is “silent” suggests that it’s not so much thinking as it is feeling. In one of his early lessons called “The Esthetic Way to Cosmic Consciousness,” Yogananda speaks repeatedly of feeling God in your heart, feeling God in others, feeling God all around you in every moment, as expressed in the chant, “I will sing Thy name I will drink Thy name and get all drunk O with Thy name! I will dance through hearts I will dance through lives and sing Thy name and sing Thy name.” But as often happens in lyrics, the most accurate word doesn’t necessarily sound right. It’s doesn’t work here, in other words, to say, “In my heart, Lord, ever so silently, I will always feel Thee.” People relate much more easily to “I will always think of Thee.” A devotee, though, should concentrate on feeling God’s living presence, not just thinking about God.

With feeling, it’s also clear to see that the “heart” spoken of here is both the heart chakra, where we naturally feel love and devotion, as well as the hearts or “centers” of each of the other chakras. The message is then, “In every chakra of my spine, O Lord, I will feel Thy presence. I will direct the energies of each chakra upwards in devotion to Thee, bringing that energy to wholly concentrate on Thee at the spiritual eye.” This is what’s really said by the “thinking”: directing all one’s energies, all along the spine, upwards in meditation.

The Italian words—the original words, as the song was first written in Italian—makes the meaning even more clear:

Nel silenzio del mio cuor, Signor
Penserò solo a Te.

A direct translations of which is:

In the silence of my heart, Lord,
I’ll think only of you.

That word “only”—which doesn’t make it into the English translation—implies concentration, as one does in meditation. The English is close, “I will always think of Thee,” but it’s not quite as strongly exclusive. Thinking only of God, which is to say, concentrating on His presence, is the real intended affirmation here.

The first verse of the song naturally resonates with the heart chakra, and touches a little on the lower three chakras:

Every morning, when I greet the sun,
When I move forth through crowded ways.

That wakefulness and moving about within the material world suggests outward engagement, including movement of the limbs which are associated with the lower centers (the legs) and the heart (the arms). This verse, then, is saying, as before, “Oh Lord, when I go out into the world, let the hearts of those chakras feel your Presence.” The Italian words, in fact, express this sentiment more clearly:

Quando mi sveglio per salutary il sol
Quando esco nella città:

When I wake up and greet the sun
When I leave to be in the city:

(Yogananda’s poem, God, God, God, is very similar in this regard.)

The second verse then transitions the energy from the heart to the expansiveness of the throat chakra:

When I laugh, O, and when I cry with pain,
When my best friends misunderstand.

Quando rido e quando piango
Nei malintesi e nell’amor:

(Translation)

When I laugh and when I cry
In misunderstandings and in love:

These words reflect pains that are usually felt in the heart chakra, including loneliness, but by turning those energies upwards to God—“I will always feel Thy presence”—you find lasting inner comfort. In other words, live in AUM, and you’ll always have the Comforter.

We next have the chorus:

Dear God, my God, I am Thine for eternity!
Dear God, my God, I am Thine eternally!

Dio, Dio, sono Tuo per l’eternità!
Dio, Dio, Tuo per l’eternità!

Translation:
God, God, I am yours for eternity!
God, God, yours for eternity!

At the end of the first phrase of the chorus, there’s an A chord that held for a full measure, which can sound a little dissonant or at least incomplete. This dissonance resonates with the medulla, the seat of the ego. I’ve found this to be true in many cases: that bit of conflict typically resonates with that part of the spine where we experience the struggle between the little self and the Greater Self, between the ego and the divine consciousness trying to come out. In this case, though, that resonance serves to lift the energy up from the throat chakra the medulla, which is still up upwards movement.

The third verse then purifies the ego at the medulla, affirming that you love God no matter what befalls you:

Though my path lead me over desert sands
Though it take me through bitter storms,

Again, the original Italian is somewhat stronger because it clearly makes the contrast between the ups and downs:

Nella sconfitta, nella vittoria
Nella vita intorn’ a me:

In defeat, in victory,
In the Life of me:

These words, in short, help the ego at the medulla to surrender it’s idea of what should happen, to surrender it’s likes and dislikes and offer itself upwards to the divine at the spiritual eye.

We can then affirm in the fourth verse that we simply love God, always (as in the last verse of God, God, God), and in the English we do get the victory/defeat idea, whereas in the Italian we get the idea of joys and sorrows:

When I’m working and when in earned repose,
Let come vict’ry or low defeat,

Nella voro e nel riposo
Nella gioia e nel dolor:

Translation
In work and rest,
In joy and sorrow:

No matter what, the song is telling us, keep your focus at the spiritual eye.

We now repeat the chorus once more, which keep the energy up at the spiritual eye (even with the discord), and perhaps even repeat the chorus to relax into meditation at that point. And then, if the song is sung through again (as Kriyananda does in the recording from An Evening in Italy), we’re repeating everything from the perspective of the spiritual eye. (This is a common theme in Ananda Music: raise the energy on the first time through the song, then repeat the song again from the spiritual eye to see everything from a higher perspective, making another round through the chakras to lift their energies even more.)

Overall, the mood of the song, especially Kriyananda’s version with both Italian and English, is warming, soothing, and comforting. Comfort, I would say is the primary vibration and consciousness, like the warm comfort of a blanket that comes when you continually feel God in every experience, no matter where you are, no matter what is happening. (Some of my sweetest moments with God, for example, have come when I’m doing something simple, like shopping for groceries.)

With this thought, I would think that performances of I Will Always Think of Thee shouldn’t been too outwardly boisterous, but rather focus on being calm and soothing. That might be hard to do with a big choir, but is worth the effort to express clearly.[1]

What, then, is the opposite consciousness to all this? Several things come to mind; a cold reliance on the little self or ego, for one, as well as an excessive concern over details and trying to personally and individually control every detail. The opposite would be, “I’ll think of God when I get my life in order, when I retire, when I get a new sofa, when….” You surely know the drill, which is to be enmeshed in the negative emotions of worry and angst. The song, therefore, works as an antidote to these emotions.

It also words to relieve suffering, especially the suffering from the belief that God and the Universe are cold and uncaring. The song says: no matter what, bring God into it, and he will “make good your deficiencies and render permanent your gains” as it says in the Bhagavad Gita. It’s also like that line from the Festival of Light: “Whereas suffering and sorrow, in the past, were the coin of man’s redemption, for us now the payment has been exchanged for calm acceptance and joy.” These thoughts are clearly in the song: accept the joys and sorrows, accept the victories and defeats, accepts the hurts and misunderstandings, accept the need to go out into the world to fulfill your dharma: accept all of them, and you can overcome so many sorrows. As it also says in the Festival of Light, quoting again from the Gita, “even a little practice of this inward religion,” which is to say, directing your energies upwards to God, “will free one from dire fears and colossal sufferings.” It’s really true, and is really as simple as letting a song like this do its magic!

I think I Will Always Think of Thee can also work for irritation with God, or, you might say, irritation at God’s apparent aloofness. That is, we can get stuck in the thought that “God doesn’t come to me! Why does he not reveal himself?” The truth, though, is that God is always present, not only all around us but in the heart of every atom in our bodies. It’s we who need to make ourselves aware of that constant presence by attuning ourselves to it, which means to put ourselves into vibrational alignment. That’s what the thinking of God, the focus on feeling God, accomplishes!

In my heart, Lord, in the heart of every atom of myself and all creation, in the hearts of every center in my spine, I will be aware of Thy eternal presence, and in that awareness, I will realize that you’ve ever been the nearest of the near and the dearest of the dear.

Such is the consciousness that helps us realize that irritation with God is entirely misplaced. We should only be irritated with ourselves, but even then, it’s best to cast aside that irritation altogether and just dwell in God’s presence. As Sri Yukteswar said, “Forget the past. The vanished lives of all men,” which is say, all time up to this very moment, “is dark with many shames,” and many moments of forgetfulness of God. “But everything in future will improve if you are making the right spiritual effort now,” that is, the right effort to feel God.

I Will Always Think of Thee is so helpful in this regard, and so beautiful in its simplicity, that I think it could even be part of the Festival of Light. In any case, it’s worth learning and making part of each day, especially if you can learn and feel the deep devotion of the original Italian lyrics.

Footnotes:

[1] I’ll admit that my first performance of this song, which was actually my first performance of any piece of Ananda Music when I was quite new on the path, was almost the opposite of being calm and soothing. I’m afraid I let me joyous enthusiasm for having discovered Yogananda’s path get the best of me! [Return]