This song is an antidote for:

  • Doubt
  • Loneliness
  • Wishful thinking
  • Disappointment
  • Selfish love

Listen to the song (download mp3):

Bonus Track (download mp3):

Watch the session with Satyaki:

From A Tale of Songs, by Swami Kriyananda:

This lighthearted song is set in Scotland, with no particularly spiritual message except for this: Desire leads to many a false superstition, hope, and expectation.

Jenny will love me: It’s all been foretold.
Was not our nag to that blind parson sold?
Jenny will love me, it’s clear as the day:
The heather bloomed early this spring on the brae.

Jenny will love me, it’s clear as a bell;
Omens aplenty the same story tell!
Not without reason her cat, colored white,
Crossed over my path in the dark of the night.

Jenny will love me, I’m sure of it now:
Did she not smile when I gave her that cow?
Soon we’ll be one, Like two peas in a pod:
Envied by men, but united by God.

The song as an antidote (Satyaki’s comments):

Jenny Will Love Me is one of Swami Kriyananda’s more playful, even slightly silly, songs, along the lines of Hawaiiana (whose words are nonsense) and perhaps Dublin Town, but Jenny tells a story that itself doesn’t have any particular meaning other than naïve hopefulness. Kriyananda, in fact, specifically said that this song doesn’t have any particular outward spiritual message. In the album notes for Some of My Favorites, he writes:

My purpose wasn’t to write music so much as to convey, through music, intuitions of divine love and joy. Even the gayest song in this album, Jenny Will love Me – which came to me, believe it or not, during meditation – about a lovesick swain whose own words make it clear he doesn’t stand much of a chance of winning the girl, and doesn’t really deserve to win her (after cheating a blind parson by selling him an old nag! as for his chances, what country girl wouldn’t smile to receive the costly gift of a cow?), even this song has me grinning with delight every time I sing it. It pokes gentle fun at the superstition that looks for “signs and wonders” at the expense of common sense. “Well in the divine play, there’s room aplenty for humor.”

In a way, the lightness and humor of this song—poking gentle fun at behaviors and attitudes that we all perhaps fall into at one time or another—is reminiscent of the stories of P. G. Wodehouse, which were a favorite of Kriyananda’s. He often said that Wodehouse’s genius was that he laughed not at people, but with them. And certainly many of his stories have the kind of love interests that are expressed in Jenny Will Love Me!

The song begins in a very personal and human way in its total love, it’s total willingness to believe that one’s love, however fanciful, is requited as evidenced by other “signs”:

Jenny will love me: It’s all been foretold.
Was not our nag to that blind parson sold?
Jenny will love me, It’s clear as the day:
The heather bloomed early this spring on the brae.

When you’re in love, as you’ve probably experienced, everything is beautiful and you tend to see “signs” everywhere that reinforce your joyful fancy. (Of course, if that love is not requited, then the same things eventually turn grim and sour! Such is the nature of duality.) This experience of being in love is certainly centered in the heart chakra. That love is least positively and upwardly directed (even if the selling of a nag to a blind parson is a somewhat questionable act!).

This direction helps that energy flow upwards to the 5th chakra in the second verse, which continues the story of seeing signs:

Jenny will love me, it’s clear as a bell;
Omens aplenty the same story tell!
Not without reason her cat, colored white,
Crossed over my path in the dark of the night.

Such continued willingness to see “evidence” in the world around you is a kind of dreaminess, which is a 5th chakra quality, but potentially a negative one. That is, there’s a point at which the positive quality of expansiveness turns into wishful thinking if it’s not followed up with practical action. For example, you can cast hope upon hope that a person to which you’re attracted is also attracted to you, indulging in endless fantasies about having a relationship. But if you never actually approach that person and talk to him or her, you’ll never know![1]

Helping you get grounded in your expansive love is the purpose of the melodic interlude after the second verse, which is played on a horn that is typically used as the voice of the Higher Self.[2] In this case, that Higher Self gives you pause to consider the options. This melody is more relaxed, more thoughtful, as if to ask, “Do you really believe in all these signs and wonders?” And the four final punctuated notes of that melody are a gentle reminder to “Get real!” And you agree, at least to a small extent, that your love must be a little more grounded, that it would be good to apply a little determination and will power to the matter at hand. The lyrics, in fact, indicate a direct action:

Jenny will love me, I’m sure of it now:
Did she not smile when I gave her that cow?

Unfortunately, the ego—at the medulla now—is still looking for reinforcement of its fantasies, affirming its desire by saying, “I tried something and got a smile, so I’m sure that she loves me!” (irrespective of the fact, as Kriyananda points out, that any country girl would be delighted with the expensive gift of a cow!) And you go on to affirm even more strongly, in a way that brings the energy up to the spiritual eye:

Soon we’ll be one, Like two peas in a pod:
Envied by men, but united by God.

Now even though you may still be dwelling on a fantasy, the Higher Self has played a little trick on you: it’s brought the energy up from the heart and throat—where the energy can still turn downwards—to the spiritual eye. In doing so, you being to realize, little by little, that it’s not necessarily Jenny that you’re seeking, but rather a sense of expansive love and union—by God, as the lyrics say, and possibly even with God.

Indeed, the Higher Self accomplishes its goal not by demolishing your innocent delusions—for again, there was certainly positive intent in all this—but by pulling the energy up just enough to where you can start to see the delusions for yourself.

That’s why we now go through the song again, but this time we’re less personally involved and more of an observer of our own follies. You can see how silly it was to believe in all those “signs” around you, and you can laugh at yourself. It’s like you’re in a P. G. Wodehouse story, now able to delight in the comedy and to see that all your “aspirations” weren’t necessarily wrong, just limited.

Going though the first and second verses again, then, you see that even though Jenny herself might not be showing any signs, your expansive love brings a surprise: it actually drawing love and beauty out of the world around you, as in the blooming of the heather. It’s here that you begin to realize that Jenny’s specific love isn’t all that important if you’re feeling love from all of life.

We also hear a repeat of the melodic interlude, played this time on a different, brighter horn, as if to signify that delight. The melody here is like feeling all that love being reflected back to you from all those things in the world.

Then, as we go through the third verse again, our expansive love that grounded in the Higher Self leads us to discover that it’s God who loves you. Not will, but does. Jenny was only the channel through which God awakened your love and helped it expand beyond the specific Jenny to really see Jenny in everything.

Put simply, Jenny Will Love Me helps transform particular, personal, selfish love into universal love, and helps to overcome the disappointment that usually arises from such personal attachments. It helps also to overcome the idea that “No one love me,” which is loneliness.

By keeping the heart’s energy moving upwards, past the throat chakra, it also overcome doubt, which is a negative quality of that chakra. As Kriyananda writes in Day 17 Secrets of Emotional Healing, to which he assigned this song (along with Emerald Isle):

The secret of overcoming doubt is to concentrate on your reasons for gratitude to life, and not to focus on all those things which seem to you imperfect [like unrequited love]. Love other people. Love truth. Love! Fill your heart with generous sentiments, and doubts will flee like shadows before the sunrise.

And, as the song indicates, it’s important to act to overcome wishful thinking (which is to say, wistful hopefulness). Action is what always turns dreams into reality, or at least turns them into clarity which, in the case of Jenny, is the clarity that specific thought of “Jenny will love me” into “Of course I’m loved, because Jenny is just one potential channel for God and God loves me through many channels!”

Footnotes

[1] Unfortunately, if you do reach out to a person and he or she doesn’t feel the same way about you, that rising heart energy can easily sink downwards into bitterness, or worse. For example, John Hinkley Jr. attempted to assassinate President Reagan in early 1981, specifically to get the attention of actress Jodie Foster, to whom he’d written many notes letters without receiving a reply. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Hinckley_Jr.#Obsession_with_Jodie_Foster. [Return]

[2] I consider this interlude important enough that when I’ve performed Jenny Will Love Me as a solo, I’ll whistle the melody. [Return]